Slow Down Or Die!

google Zoom Out—Zoom In

A few years ago I wrote Google and asked if I could use the phrase Zoom Out—Zoom In to write a short book. Nope was the answer.

Zooming Out helps us see the whole picture. Zooming In helps us see part of the picture.

Good leaders Zoom Out. They see the big picture. They see, understand, and appreciate the key players who are creating the many aspects of the whole picture.

Sometimes people and teams are so Zoomed In they can’t see nor appreciate the whole picture.

If you work in an organization most likely you are most concerned / focused upon the growth and progress of your area. You may need to Zoom Out to understand you and your team are a part of the whole. 

Starry Starry Night

I was on a team of teams a few years ago. We were silo-ed. Everyone was concerned about their area and were very focused. We were attempting to encourage all the teams to care about our environment / atmosphere and to embrace our responsibility to help create a friendly open hearted experience for our guests. We needed everyone’s buy in.

I created an illustration.

I showed a blue pixel of a famous picture on a big screen. I spoke about being Zoomed In and the importance of being zoomed in, but not being so zoomed in we miss seeing the big picture. In order to see and understand the big picture we needed to Zoom Out. Zooming out helps us to see the whole enchilada and together, as a whole group, can create the space / atmosphere / environment we needed to create. The questions then followed. What do we want to create? How do we create the vibe, atmosphere, environment? What is our role?

Here is the pixel: Zoomed In

Here is the picture: Zoomed Out

starry-night-art-plain

Knowing / discerning when we need to Zoom Out or to Zoom In is very important. Sometimes we are so close / Zoomed In to a situation we need to slow down to create space where we can Zoom Out.

Taking the time, creating space to Zoom Out allows us to have a birds eye view to assess a problem, a direction, or an opportunity. Then, after our assessment, we can Zoom In to deal with what needs dealing with, or to create what we need to create.

If you are under pressure in your personal life and relationships you may want to push pause, Zoom Out in order to see and understand your situation from a different point of view.

Tip: It helps to put on your Spock logic persona and to take off your emotional persona.

Questions to ask:

  • Where can I go to find space to Zoom Out and reflect?
  • What’s going on within my environments?(White board)
  • Where do I need to focus Zoom In in each environment? (family, work, friends, potential opportunities)
  • How am I doing with my relationships at home, church and beyond?
  • Be determined to create margin in your schedule for what’s most important.
  • Is this something Jesus wants me to continue to invest my energy and focus?

Remember:

Most people have great strengths.
Sometimes our strengths are our weaknesses.

Runners learn to pace themselves, maybe we should too?

slow_down_or_die

Coach Susan Paul: “Typically runners add 30 seconds per mile to their goal race pace to as much as 2 minutes per mile. How much you choose to slow down is up to you, but remember the longer the run, the slower the pace should be on most days.
Keep in mind it’s often hard to hit the perfect pace for every run.
Your training paces will also vary based on the weather conditions or the terrain. Maybe you’ve had poor sleep or have been stressed at work. This will affect how you pace yourself!”
The Runner’s World Editors Mar 4, 2019

Take a moment and think through the above allegory.

  • How long will it be before you are finished with this series, or project, etc? Think realistically. Create margin in your plan.
  • Remember, you are not perfect. Give yourself permission for mid-course corrections. Don’t be so hard on yourself.
  • Remember you are an atmosphere architect. Creating takes time.
  • Don’t stop your training paces. What are your basic practices? Time with Jesus, reading, journal, exercising, family nights, date nights with your spouse, eating well and sleeping. Adjust your time accordingly.
  • Take a break. Do something fun and totally different.
  • You have the power to pace yourself in your terrain.

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